Skip to Content

Truck Dies When I Give It Gas – Why And What To Do?

It can be frustrating if your truck dies whenever you try to give it gas. It's even more frustrating when you don't know the problem. Let's look at the possible causes and see if we can get to the bottom of this.

If your truck dies every time you give it gas, it could be due to the following reasons:

  • Faulty ECM
  • Incorrect Air/Fuel Mixture
  • Vacuum Leak
  • Bad Fuel Pump
  • Dirty Fuel Injectors
  • Blocked Air Filter
  • Clogged Oil Filter
  • Faulty EGR Valve
  • Bad Ignition Switch
  • Faulty Mass Air Flow Sensor

Pinpointing the exact issue can be difficult, but ruling out each of these possible causes one by one can help you get to the bottom of the problem. This article will discuss why each of these could be causing your truck to stall when you give it gas.

Before you continue reading, let us say we hope you find the links here useful. If you purchase something through a link on this page, we may get a commission, so thank you!

In addition, we will answer other frequently asked questions about this issue.

Ram 2500 Red Type Truck Parked in front of an apartment, Truck Dies When I Give It Gas - Why And What To Do?

Why Is My Truck Dying When I Give It Gas?

Vehicles have several components that make them run, and when one of those components isn't working correctly, it can cause the truck to stall.

For example, your truck may idle fine, but as soon as you give it gas, it dies.

This can be difficult to diagnose because several things can cause it. It's important to rule out each possibility to find the source of the problem.

Picture showing muscular car service worker repairing vehicle

Let's look at some of the most common reasons your truck may die when you give it gas.

Faulty ECM

A faulty ECM is one possible reason your truck dies when you give it gas. The ECM, or engine control module, manages the engine's ignition timing and fuel injection.

If it isn't working properly, it can cause the engine to stall.

To test if the ECM is the problem, you can try disconnecting the battery and reconnecting it. This will reset the ECM and may fix the problem.

If that doesn't work, you'll need to take it to a mechanic to have it checked out.

The ECM itself may be faulty, or there may be an issue with the wiring. Either way, a mechanic will be able to diagnose and fix the problem.

Incorrect Air/Fuel Mixture

Another possible cause of your truck dying when you give it gas is an incorrect air/fuel mixture. Typically, a sensor could be dirty or faulty, causing the mixture to be off.

This can cause the engine to stall or run poorly.

If you have a code reader, you can check for any error codes that may help indicate the problem. If not, check your sensors and make sure they're clean and in good working order.

You may be able to clean or replace the sensors yourself, but if unsure, it's always best to take it to a mechanic.

Vacuum Leak

A vacuum leak is another possible cause of your truck dying when you gas it up. The engine needs a certain amount of vacuum to run correctly. If there's a leak, it can cause the engine to stall.

To check for a vacuum leak, you can use a vacuum gauge. If the reading is low, there's a chance there's a leak. You can also try spraying starting fluid around the engine while running.

If the engine speeds up, you know there's a leak in that area.

Bad Fuel Pump

Another possible reason your truck is dying when you give it gas is a bad fuel pump. The fuel pump is responsible for delivering fuel to the engine.

The engine will run poorly or stall if it isn't working properly.

You can check the fuel pressure with a gauge to see if it's within the normal range. If it's not, there's a good chance the fuel pump is to blame.

If you hear a noise from the fuel tank when you turn on the ignition, that's another sign of a bad fuel pump.

Replacing a fuel pump is not difficult, but it's best to leave it to a mechanic if you're not confident in your abilities.

Dirty Fuel Injectors

If your truck has dirty fuel injectors, it can cause the engine to stall when you give it gas. Fuel injectors deliver fuel to the engine; if they're dirty, the fuel can't flow properly.

This can cause all sorts of problems, including stalling.

You can clean the fuel injectors yourself or take them to a mechanic to have them cleaned. However, they're also possibly damaged and need to be replaced.

Car mechanic fixing modern diesel engine, closeup of hand removing injectors from cylinder head

Blocked Air Filter

A blocked air filter can also cause your truck to die when you give it gas. The engine needs a certain amount of air to run correctly; if the air filter is blocked, it can restrict the airflow.

This can cause the engine to stall.

You can check the air filter and see if it's dirty or blocked. If it is, you can clean or replace it.

Clogged Oil Filter

If the oil filter is clogged, it can cause your truck to stall when you give it gas. The oil filter is responsible for filtering out impurities from the engine oil.

If it's clogged, it can restrict the oil flow and cause the engine to stall. You can check the oil filter yourself and see if it needs to be replaced. If it is, you can replace it with a new one.

Faulty EGR Valve

Another possible cause of your truck dying when you give it gas is a faulty EGR valve. The EGR valve helps regulate the number of exhaust gases that flow into the engine.

If it's not working properly, it can cause the engine to stall.

You can check the EGR valve yourself and see if it's dirty or damaged. If it is, you can clean or replace it.

Bad Ignition Switch

If the ignition switch is bad, it can also cause your truck to die when you give it gas. The ignition switch is responsible for supplying power to the engine.

The engine will run poorly or stall if it's not working properly.

You can check the ignition switch with a multimeter. If the reading is low, there's a chance the switch is bad. You can also try replacing the switch to see if that fixes the problem.

Bad Mass Air Flow Sensor

A bad mass air flow sensor can also cause your truck to die when you give it gas.

The mass air flow sensor measures the amount of air flowing into the engine. If it's not working correctly, it can cause the engine to stall.

You can check the mass air flow sensor with a multimeter. If the reading is low, there's a chance the sensor is bad. You can also try replacing the sensor to see if that fixes the problem.

As you can see, there are a few reasons your truck might die when you gas it up. If you're having this problem, diagnosing and fixing it as soon as possible is best.

Otherwise, you might find yourself stranded on the side of the road.

Check and replace oxygen sensor by car technician

How Much Is A New Fuel Pump?

If you have pinpointed that your fuel pump is the problem, then you're probably wondering how much it will cost to replace it. The cost of a new fuel pump will vary depending on the make and model of your truck.

However, you can expect to pay anywhere from $200-$1,000 for a new one.

The cost will also vary depending on whether you fix it or have a mechanic do it. If you're going to fix it yourself, you'll have to pay for the cost of the fuel pump.

However, if you're going to have a mechanic do it, you'll have to pay for both the cost of the fuel pump and labor.

Depending on your mechanic skills, paying for the labor and having a professional do it might be worth it. They'll likely do a better job, and you won't have to worry about damaging anything.

How Often Should You Clean Fuel Injectors?

Depending on your driving habits and elements, you might have to clean your fuel injectors more or less often. However, cleaning them every 60,000-90,000 miles is generally recommended.

Cleaning engine injectors, Car repair,Service station

If you drive on dusty or dirt roads, you might have to clean them more often. The same goes for if you use low-quality gasoline.

On the other hand, if you drive primarily on highways and use high-quality gasoline, you might go longer between cleanings.

Either way, checking your owner's manual for specific recommendations is always a good idea.

Final Thoughts

Ram 2500 Red Type Truck Parked in front of an apartment

You can troubleshoot a problem with a truck that dies when you give it gas by checking the parts responsible for fueling the engine. Start with the easy and less expensive parts to rule them out before moving on to the more difficult or expensive ones.

If you still can't figure out the problem, then it's best to take it to a mechanic and have them diagnose it. They have the experience and tools to troubleshoot the problem and correctly get your truck running again.

Made it to the end? Here are some other articles you might find helpful:

Why Does My Ford F150 Shut Off When I Stop?

Gauges Go Crazy When Starting Car (Or Trying To) – What To Do?

Check Engine Light Comes On After Getting Gas – What's Wrong?